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How would you guys handle a disagreement with a doctor? Any idea?

Michelle

Anonymous Answered question July 28, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

RN of 17 years working at teaching hospital, so I have a lot of experience questioning things especially with residents when you know the attending so well.  I find if you ask them to explain why. What is the evidence based practice for it? Why would this order suit the patient’s condition right now? Plus working for so long you just know what the attending doc likes and doesn’t like as far as orders like the back of your hand.  I come with respect and advocacy for my patient.  However I’m not afraid to escalate up the ladder at all.  As a nurse if I’m not comfortable giving something that’s off the wall, Doctors have the final say but doctors can also give the patients medications too.  Give that crazy ass order doc. I’ll chart and monitor but shit hits the fan.  You gave it!  Also, I’ve just straight up came with the same energy they came with.  They will not disrespect me or a patient period cause they are having a bad day or whatever. Everyone does. Suck it up buttercup.  I don’t do it in front of patients.  But they will NOT belittle or make a patient/nurse  feel stupid for asking medical questions .  NO NO! As my patients’ nurse and the charge nurse on the floor, we have a big problem. I’ll go straight to attending and chief of staff and the Floor Director and DON.  That I don’t tolerate.

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 28, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

I’m working WITH you and not FOR you. All disagreements with doctors are starting from this

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 28, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

When you have the patient’s best interest in mind, you have to just say, “I’m just doing what’s best for the patient”. You’re never wrong when you’re putting the patient first. He/she can’t argue with that, hospital executive can’t argue with that… nobody can argue with that.

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 28, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

First time they will disagree with me I’ll just tell my doctor sit down there and watch what happens of course it will happen then I’ll just watch and the first thing they do is call me and I’ll just say this “now do you believe me?” Then the patient will be stable,then I’ll say who did you call and my MD will just say in a small voice “you” and I’ll say it with a big smile lesson learned rigth? And my MD will just nod like one of those toy puppies nodding there head it always work 🙂🙂💪🏽

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 28, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

Spice his coffee with laxatives. He’ll know better next time.

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 12, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

Hi, make sure youre having the right answer or solution (EBP) and being humble during the argument but at the same time firm and courage in your decision. If its related to an intervention to the patient and you find insecure doing it, just invite him to do it my him/herself, in an humble way. Make sure to having a witness near, that will help in case the doctor try to change his version.

Sometimes being humble does not function, but being respect will give you an advantage during the argument.

We are just not to follow doctors orders like a monkey…🤷🏻‍♀️

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 11, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

Depends on the disagreement. I have had a few in regards to processes, especially Infection Control. Always make sure you have solid evidence to back yourself up. We work in a field where our practice should be evidence based and I find Drs are usually pretty scientifically minded. As above post says also make sure you approach in a respectful manner – maybe not in front of patients or their peers also.

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 11, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

Always climb the ladder go to the fellow or if need be call the attending even if you wake them up.  You’re always a patient advocate. Oh and chart the shit out of it and tell the jerk Doc to please read your notes.  And always be professional and remember your manners

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 11, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

If there is no enough medical reasons to satisfy me to follow the order there is no room for argumentation! I will move on and look for second opinion. Because I will make the Ultimate Decision. Personally dont see any argumantation.

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 11, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

I agree with anonymous. I tell our new grads to keep asking questions as to why, until your concern is addressed.

On that same note though I have refused to give Lasix to a hypotensive(not baseline, on med/surg) pt despite the doctors saying give it.

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 11, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

Talk it out. Stay calm but firm and don’t let them dismiss you. “Could you try explaining that in a different way?” “Maybe you could explain your rational for me” “from a nursing perspective…” “maybe we can talk to the patient/family together to get to the bottom of this” remember they’re overworked too and might feel threatened when questioned so try to be considerate but also don’t be afraid to stand up for yourself.

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 11, 2022
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Anonymous 0 Comments

Have a respectful and professional discussion with them.  If it’s an order that doesn’t seem appropriate, I will say something like, “I don’t understand this order, can you educate me about this”?  Most of the time they are happy to explain. If they are defensive or brush me off, I will push for an answer.  If I still don’t get a satisfactory answer, I escalate to my charge nurse, or will go ask the the attending to educate me.  In general, the nurses on my unit are very well respected and the attendings are happy to address any of our questions.  I take care to not approach in a disrespectful or aggressive manner and 99% of the time either myself or the MD walks away from the discussion with more knowledge (I work at a teaching hospital and with a lot of residents, so there are lots of times I am questioning things).

Nursilium Changed status to publish July 8, 2022